I AM NOT YOUR NEGRO - ACT Human Rights Film Festival Screening

I Am Not Your Negro
Friday, 4/21, 7:00 p.m.
Lory Student Center Theatre
Regular $10, Student/Senior $5
4-Pack Regular $30, Student/Senior $15
Q&A Guest: Special guest TBA
Closing Night Reception

http://www.iamnotyournegrofilm.com/trailer
James Baldwin wrote a letter to his literary agent describing his next project, Remember This House. The book was to be a revolutionary, personal account of the lives and successive assassinations of three of his close friends—Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr. At the time of Baldwin’s death in 1987, he left behind only thirty completed pages of this manuscript.Now, in his incendiary new documentary, master filmmaker Raoul Peck envisions the book James Baldwin never finished. The result is a radical, up-to-the-minute examination of race in America, using Baldwin’s original words and flood of rich archival material. I Am Not Your Negro is a journey into black history that connects the past of the Civil Rights movement to the present of #BlackLivesMatter. It is a film that questions black representation in Hollywood and beyond. And, ultimately, by confronting the deeper connections between the lives and assassination of these three leaders, Baldwin and Peck have produced a work that challenges the very definition of what America stands for. Q&A Guest: Special guest TBA. Closing night reception follows in the Lory Student Center West Ballroom.

Raoul Peck
(2017)
93 minutes
USA

Sing Your Song! ACT Human Rights Film Festival Screening

Sing Your Song
Friday, 4/21 - 4:30 p.m.
Lory Student Center Theater
Free admission with a hard ticket. Get yours now/Reserve Yours, etc.

https://youtu.be/M9-_iTNwamU
Trailer embed code:

Wonderfully archived, and told with a remarkable sense of intimacy, visual style, and musical panache, Susanne Rostock’s inspiring biographical documentary, SING YOUR SONG, surveys the life and times of singer/actor/activist Harry Belafonte. From his rise to fame as a singer, inspired by Paul Robeson, and his experiences touring a segregated country, to his provocative crossover into Hollywood, Belafonte’s groundbreaking career personifies the American civil rights movement and impacted many other social justice movements. Rostock reveals Belafonte as a tenacious hands-on activist, who worked intimately with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., mobilized celebrities for social justice, participated in the struggle against apartheid in South Africa, and took action to counter gang violence, prisons, and the incarceration of youth.

Susanne Rostock
(2011)
104 minutes
USA

Transit Havana - ACT Human Rights Film Festival Screening

Transit Havana
Thursday, 4/20 - 7:00 p.m.
Lory Student Center Theatre
Regular $10, Student/Senior $5
4-Pack Regular $30, Student/Senior $15
Q&A Guest: Daniel Amba, director
COLORADO PREMIER

https://vimeo.com/157418213
Once a year, two plastic surgeons from Holland and Belgium fly to Havana to perform surgery on five Cuban transgender persons. The surgeons are invited by Mariela Castro, daughter of the president and head of the new state program for transgender care.Castro organizes this as a modern completion of the socialist revolution of 1959 because, in her words, it is all about emancipation and self-realization. ‘Hómofobia no, socialismo sí!’ is the official slogan. The state helps transgender people with therapy, hormones, surgery and a new identity. Q&A Guest: Daniel Amba, director

Daniel Amba
(2016)
86 minutes
Cuba

WALLS - ACT Human Rights Film Festival Screening

Walls
Thursday, 4/20 - 4:30 p.m.
Lory Student Center Theatre
Regular $10, Student/Senior $5
4-Pack Regular $30, Student/Senior $15
Q&A Guest: Alvaro Enciso, film subject
COLORADO PREMIER

http://wallsmuros.com/en/documentary-film-walls/
When the Berlin Wall came down, we dismissed the idea of separation walls as something from the past. Reality is exactly the opposite. There have never been so many walls. There are thousands of kilometres of fences, gates, barbed wire and barriers in the most distant and dissimilar parts of the world. This film tells the true stories of people living on both sides of very different walls. These are intimate and intense stories that show us that on both sides, we all share the same hopes, fears, thoughts and emotions; the same desire to survive. Q&A Guest: Alvaro Enciso, film subject

Pablo Irabur and Migueltxo Molina
(2016)
80 minutes
Spain

Jackson - ACT Human Rights Film Festival Screening

Jackson
Wednesday, 4/19 - 7:00 p.m.
Magnolia Theatre, Lincoln Center
Regular $10, Student/Senior $5
4-Pack Regular $30, Student/Senior $15
Q&A Guests: Maisie Crow, director and April Jackson, film subject

http://www.jacksonthefilm.com/trailer/
Jackson is an intimate, unprecedented look at the lives of three women caught up in the complex issues surrounding abortion access. Set against the backdrop of the fight to close the last abortion clinic in Mississippi, Jackson captures the essential and hard truth of the lives at the center of the debate over reproductive healthcare in America. Q&A Guests: Maisie Crow, director and April Jackson, film subject

Maisie Crow
(2016)
92 minutes
USA

Solitary - ACT Human Rights Film Festival Screening

Solitary
Wednesday, 4/19 - 4:30 p.m.
Magnolia Theatre, Lincoln Center
Regular $10, Student/Senior $5
4-Pack Regular $30, Student/Senior $15

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RwoDVLWK_6w
There are 100,000 US citizens in solitary confinement across the country, a staggering number prompting comment from both President Obama and the Pope. Situated in rural Virginia, 300 miles from any urban center, Red Onion State Prison is one of over 40 supermax prisons across the US built to hold prisoners in eight-by-ten-foot cells for 23 hours a day. With unprecedented access, director Kristi Jacobson offers a revealing and moving portrait of life inside solitary confinement. Q&A Guest: TBA

Kristi Jacobson
(2016)
82 minutes
USA

They Will Have to Kill us First - ACT Human Rights Film Festival Screening

They Will Have To Kill Us First
Tuesday, 4/18 - 7:00 p.m.
Magnolia Theatre, Lincoln Center
Regular $10, Student/Senior $5
4-Pack Regular $30, Student/Senior $15
Q&A Guest: Johanna Schwartz, director

https://vimeo.com/153930504
They Will Have To Kill Us First: Malian music in exile is a feature-length documentary following musicians in Mali in the wake of a jihadist takeover and subsequent banning of music. Music, one of the most important forms of communication in Mali, disappeared overnight in 2012 when Islamic extremists groups rose up to capture an area the size of the UK and France combined. But rather than lay down their instruments, Mali’s musicians fought back. Q&A Guest: Johanna Schwartz, director

Johanna Schwartz
(2015)
105 mins.
Mali

Frame By Frame - ACT Human Rights Film Festival Screening

Frame by Frame
Tuesday, 4/18 - 4:30 p.m.
Magnolia Theatre, Lincoln Center
Regular $10, Student/Senior $5
4-Pack Regular $30, Student/Senior $15

https://vimeo.com/141104728
Set in a modern Afghanistan bursting with color and character, FRAME BY FRAME follows four Afghan photojournalists as they navigate an emerging and dangerous media landscape – reframing Afghanistan for the world, and for themselves. Q&A Guest: TBA

Alexandria Bombach, Mo Scarpelli
(2015)
85 minutes
Afghanistan

The Apology - ACT Human Rights Film Festival Screening

The Apology
Monday, 4/17 - 7:00 p.m.
Magnolia Theatre, Lincoln Center
Regular $10, Student/Senior $5
4-Pack Regular $30, Student/Senior $15
SPECIAL ADVANCED SCREENING
Q&A Guests: Tiffany Hsiung, director, and Maija Devine, author

https://vimeo.com/159796075
The Apology follows the personal journeys of three former “comfort women” who were among the 200,000 girls and young women kidnapped and forced into military sexual slavery by the Imperial Japanese Army during World War II. Some 70 years after their imprisonment in so-called “comfort stations”, the three “grandmothers—Grandma Gil in South Korea, Grandma Cao in China, and Grandma Adela in the Philippines—face their twilight years in fading health. After decades of living in silence and shame about their past, they know that time is running out to give a first-hand account of the truth and ensure that this horrific chapter of history is not forgotten. Whether they are seeking a formal apology from the Japanese government or summoning the courage to finally share their secret with loved ones, their resolve moves them forward as they seize this last chance to set future generations on a course for reconciliation, healing, and justice. Q&A Guests: Tiffany Hsiung, director, and Maija Devine, author

Tiffany Hsiung
(2016)
104 minutes
Canada | South Korea | Philippines

The Fog of Srebrenica - ACT Human Rights Film Festival Screening

The Fog of Srebrenica
Monday, 4/17 - 4:30 p.m.
Magnolia Theatre, Lincoln Center
Regular $10, Student/Senior $5
4-Pack Regular $30, Student/Senior $15
Q&A Guest: Samir Mehanovic, director

https://vimeo.com/ondemand/thefogofsrebrenica/129314925
July 11, 2015, marked the 20th anniversary of the Srebrenica genocide, the only holocaust in Europe since World War II, when 8,372 Bosnian men and boys were killed in one week. In the documentary film Srebrenica Survivors we meet a cast of extraordinary characters, people who have been struggling to come to terms with the past while dealing with the harsh realities of living in one of the poorest countries in Europe. Their stories raise serious and profound questions about the nature of human existence, war and forgiveness. Q&A Guest: Samir Mehanovic, director

Samir Mehanovic
(2015)
60 minutes
Bosnia

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